BEGINNING OF GI STASIS???

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by BUNBUNANDC, Feb 23, 2019.

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  1. Feb 23, 2019 #1

    BUNBUNANDC

    BUNBUNANDC

    BUNBUNANDC

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    Henlo
    My bunny is a 5 month old, male Netherland Dwarf.
    He often has some problems with digestion - usually having very soft stools or diarrhea (which I took him to the vet for and he’s been pretty well ever since.)
    He’s had no problems the past week or so and then yesterday evening after having been running around the house almost the entire day (which is a new playground for him so maybe that has to do with it) I caught him chewing on a piece of nylon only for a few seconds before I pulled it out of his mouth so I’m not even sure if he ingested any of it) and he hasn’t really pooped much ever since, but he’s been drinking and eating and is very energetic and interactive and happy. He keeps jumping in my lap and flopping but I’m worried it’s the beginning of gi stasis since I don’t remember him ever barely pooping for that long. Vets aren’t open until tomorrow and the internet hasn’t really helped so far so please if you have any idea what Is going on cuz I’m really worried. I’ve also taken him off his pellets and gave him some wet cucumber and a tiny bite of an apple to maybe help move stuff in there
    Oh I also think I saw him farting?? Again, he isn’t showing any signs of pain or discomfort so I’m just super confused
     
  2. Feb 23, 2019 #2

    JBun

    JBun

    JBun

    Jenny - Health & Wellness Mod Staff Member Administrator Moderator

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    He could be experiencing a GI slowdown. I would just make sure he's eating plenty of hay, non starchy veggies/greens, and drinking well, as this will help keep the gut contents moving. And like you've done I might reduce pellet amounts to encourage more hay eating(provided your rabbit will actually eat more hay when pellets are reduced/removed). And just keep an eye on his eating, drinking, pooping, and behavior. As long as it remains fairly normal, I think the temporary diet changes should help get gut contents moving normally in there again.
     

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