Bald and black spots

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Uzuma, Oct 14, 2019.

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  1. Oct 14, 2019 #1

    Uzuma

    Uzuma

    Uzuma

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    Hello,
    My two rabbits had three babies earlier this year
    Just today I noticed that all three of the kids (almost three months old) have some bald spots on their backs. Two of them have some strange, clumpy, black spots in the bald areas. After observing them, I've found that the mother rabbit was pulling and chewing on the kids' fur. The kids are also licking themselves and each other on the bald spots.
    I don't think I saw the black spots on them before but my guess is that the black spots are their baby skin. I am very concerned about the bald spots. What do I do? Why is the mother rabbit pulling their fur?
     
  2. Oct 14, 2019 #2

    Preitler

    Preitler

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    Welcome :)

    My first guess would be parasites, like mites, or lice. If the black spots are tiny that would be the digested blood.
    Is the skin smooth, or somewhat flaky there?

    The mother might just try to clean them, and the fur just comes off from infested areas.
     
  3. Oct 15, 2019 #3

    Imbrium

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    Jennifer

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    She could also just be over-grooming them if they don't seem to have any of the issues Preitler mentioned... can you post some pictures of the spots so we can get a better look?

    As a note, it's time to separate them from their mom (and each other by gender) if they're closing in on 12 weeks old because they're going to start reaching sexual maturity in the next few weeks.
     
  4. Oct 15, 2019 #4

    Uzuma

    Uzuma

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    The black spots aren't tiny and the skin is smooth there

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    One of the three kids is a white rabbit and it doesn't have the black spots like the others though

    I have separated the kids from the mom for now
     
  5. Oct 15, 2019 #5

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    Jennifer

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    The black spots look like normal skin to me, at least in the pictures. I don't see anything that looks indicative of mites, fleas (or their poop) or skin irritation but I do see thinning fur in general, even in non-bald areas. My bet is still on over-grooming. How big of a space have they been housed in? Stressors like close quarters, kits who have been weaned still pestering their mom (and each other) and general boredom with their environment can potentially cause animals to over-groom themselves or their companions, even to the point of baldness.

    I recommend making sure they have enough space to run and romp and providing some enrichment items such as hard plastic baby toys like links/keys/cups, untreated wicker wreaths or baskets, plastic slinkies, cat toy balls that have a bell in them, wiffle balls, etc. (really anything hard plastic that they can pick up or push around is popular) and/or cardboard boxes (no tape, staples or colored inks) of varying size with a couple "door" holes cut in them. No clue about Bangladesh, but in the US you can get all of the stuff I listed from dollar stores for very little money.

    Also make sure you're providing them with unlimited hay (it has to be grass hay for adult rabbits, but babies/teens and nursing or pregnant does can also have legume hays like alfalfa or clover). Not having enough fiber in their diet can actually prompt some rabbits to over-groom/eat hair (like a human child with pica eating dirt or pebbles because of a mineral/vitamin deficiency)... which is especially problematic because without the long strands of fiber in hay to help move the hair through their digestive tracts, they're at significantly increased risk of developing a hairball (which can potentially be fatal).
     
  6. Oct 16, 2019 #6

    Katie

    Katie

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    When I was raising some kits a few of them kept mounting each other because they were reaching maturity and they started developing bald patches because of it. Not sure if this is the cause of your problem but just something to keep an eye out for. Even if you separate them into male and female it could still be a problem. The kits I had issues with were two females. Good Luck.
     

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