Anyone have a rabbit that is NOT spayed/neutered, and HAPPY the way they are?

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Preitler

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You're still breeding her when she is 7 years old??? and she is still producing well. I would have stopped breeding her after she turned 3. I'm surprised she wouldn't be tired of breeding by now.
No, there is no reason not to breed her, actually, almost half her litters are because she is very creative getting to the buck and doing the deed in mere seconds without my approval. In commercial meat production a doe is replaced at about 3 years, but max efficiency isn't my concern. Her litters are smaller now, about 6 now, but that's fine with me. She's quite a special rabbit, very headstrong and determined, and best mother I've ever seen - and she's craving for that - isn't that what being a rabbit is all about?;)
 
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LionheadRabbitLover

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Yep! None of mine or neutered or spayed. Don’t plan to either unless for I have to for medical reasons.
 

somebunnylovesme

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I have a buck that isn't neutered . He is an angel!!!!. He isn't aggressive and has never sprayed me.
 

Tinto

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I asked my vet about neutering my bunny here in Japan, but he kind of discouraged me. His opinion was that being such a small animal, there are always risks with the anesthesia for them, so unless I really need it he wouldn't advise. Or maybe they just want to take the responsibility in the case...
 

somebunnylovesme

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I had a rabbit had to get his back molar filled down multiple times. They had to use anesthesia to that. He also had a tumor in his lungs and with the anesthesia he was fine. The rabbit was born with the tumor. The vet was experience rabbits, you may want to seek out another vet. If they vet isn't confident that is a red flag.
 

Bam Bam

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I know it is not necessary to neuter your male unless he sprays or becomes very aggressive but isn’t it dangerous not to spay. My first rabbit died of uterin cancer because I didn’t have her spayed??
 

Sharda Hartley

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I tried to keep my male un-altered during our first few months of settling in, but he soon became VERY possessive and territorial. He started peeing and pooping where I or my cat slept, humped my cat, and regularly sprayed us both. I was worried his personality would change too, but he just got less humpy and learned to use the litterbox regularly. Bye bye balls! I do not miss you or the bad behaviour you caused!
 

Cassy315

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I suppose it's okay if you have only one. My intact buns are perfectly fine but do get into little arguments with one another. I will say my guys did a complete 180 when they were desexed. From being all over the show, digging and spraying and being territorial to being placid, calm and super affectionate(not that they weren't affectionate before)
 

Anna R.

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I have never had my females (never had males) my spayed. They are all so sweet. They did go through their "teenage" phase; but, never had any major issues that made me run out and get them spayed. I have heard of too many people loosing their babies while getting spayed. Unless there was a major health issue that needed it, I would never do it. I do have one female that is spayed as she was a rescue and she is the most aggressive of all. Unless it is really needed for health reasons I don't see the need for it.
 

Sophie.k2002

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Yeah, i have an unspayed doe. She doesn't have much bad habits.
She just sometimes poops around the house. A few poops won't kill anybody.
And it's cute sometimes.
I'm soooo happy with her. :D
 

michael1

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We have 2 doe's not sprayed no issues with them. We just couldn't do it because of the risks after surgery. Some will argue about this , we have friends that has a doe 8 yrs old never fixed all is good.
 

Cayla

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I have an unspayed female rabbit. I didn't get her spayed cause I was worried about the anesthesia possibly killing her, though now I'm worried she may get uterine cancer. In terms of behavior she's a little moody. If she doesn't know you and you get too close suddenly, she'll attack you. If she does know you then she might run around your legs and try to hump you when you stand up. I do wish I would've gotten her fixed because of health concerns but I love her to death and she's really funny and sweet ❤
 

Anna R.

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I have 4 females. Once is spayed as she was a rescue, she is almost 2 years old. The other 3 are ages 7 years, 11 mos. and 8 mos. They all have their moments. The oldest was never aggressive ever. She has always been the sweetest girl, she was a little stinker and didn't like to be held when she was younger; but, was still sweet. She is now a little cuddle bunny, and loves to be held and cuddle with me. She is still moody though; but, she gets over very fast with a treat. The other two are going through their hormonal changes, and they change daily. They are both super sweet. I did think about getting them spayed at one time because of the ovarian cancer issue; but, decided against it. I was too worried about the anesthesia issues, and didn't want to risk losing them. They go through periods of aggression, but, nothing I can't handle. They have to have "time outs" once in a while. But, nothing i would trade for anything. The one that is spayed is actually the most aggressive of all of them, and is in constant need of attention or she will sulk. I still love her with all my heart though. But, seeing how aggressive she is compared to my other older one I don't see any difference and not enough to put the others under the knife. So, I deal with them as they are, natural and free to be who they want when they want. Bunnies are a lot like us, they are all different with different moods and personalities. So, it is really up to you and the bunny. I have heard of buns getting out of control. Maybe I've been lucky enough to not have had that issue. I just give them lots of love and understanding and we all do fine as is.
 

TreasuredFriend

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One of our rescues had uterine cancer beginnings. Fortunately the 4 y.o. bun had surgery to prevent further spread. One can hop over to rescue organizations that are continually trying to peddle ahead of the overpopulation of "oops" matings or intentional breeding. AND the rescue groups will tell you of females who were not spayed at the appropriate age and succumbed to uterine cancer. Or come in to rescue delivering kits! Think of the hoarder/collectors choosing not to get vet care or sp/euter their commodity animals, and the 452 rabbits from Texas, found in filth & wire cages, now have 100 pregnant females. Locally 57 rabbits were taken into shelter care and many females arrived pregnant.

People will choose not to spend the OVH/neuter funds at a rabbit-savvy DVM b/c they do not feel it is important to prevent cancer or prevent additional pregnancies, or they can contend with spraying, obnoxious behavior, et al.

Certain people don't care that rabbits are euthanized due to not enough homes.

With rescue efforts, we ensure that all family members are safely sp/eutered. Find an excellent DVM and because pets costs money, be prepared to spend money on your companions. || Rabbits are self-induced ovulators. After volunteering at the shelter for numerous years, we witnessed lots of females coming in pregnant. Oh boy, our males born in our home after their abandoned moms were captured were very challenging with the stinky urine and their frequent spray hoses. We don't have to worry about oops pregnancies as heard about on other forum boards or this one.
 

TreasuredFriend

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The obnoxious urine smell decreased immediately after our rescue Flemmie was neutered. Before his neuter, he and bro were continual spray hose males. If you ever get sprayed on your clothes or in your face by male urine, you know what I mean. Then our rescue pulls from a shelter at 5 month old (horse farm kept the rabbits living together) were a fighting batch of sisters due to hormonal engagement.
 

ChloeBunny

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I have an unspayed female rabbit. I didn't get her spayed cause I was worried about the anesthesia possibly killing her, though now I'm worried she may get uterine cancer. In terms of behavior she's a little moody. If she doesn't know you and you get too close suddenly, she'll attack you. If she does know you then she might run around your legs and try to hump you when you stand up. I do wish I would've gotten her fixed because of health concerns but I love her to death and she's really funny and sweet ❤
If it helps, an experienced vet/exotic pet vet familiar with spaying/neutering bunnies can often be found through rescue organizations. I found my current bunny vet through the House Rabbit Society (invaluable source of bunny related info/education), that has an excellent list by state: https://rabbit.org/rabbit-veterinarians-state-listings, and in Kentucky Harvey's House is a licensed chapter of HRS http://www.harveyshouse.org/contactus/ if you want to connect to someone local who could answer questions or provide a referral. My rescue bun has had two surgeries, spaying and removal of a growth, both went very well in the experienced hands of two different vets - but yes, it can be risky.

I had no idea the high risk of uterine cancer associated w/female buns (like mine), but the choice is personal and I respect the decision either way. Best wishes!
 

michael1

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Boy oh boy do u all ever put a scare into people that don't get there doe fixed. See I'm not from USA & most of u over due in ur words with this matter. Do most of you consider it a crime not fixing a doe ? Going to say most of you do. I went to an experienced veterinarian over 30 yrs under her belt. We had a very long talk about this matter. No we didn't do it our choice. We didn't want to put them through that & the chance of having serious consequences with the chance of losing them. Some people smoke or drink all there lives never die because of either. Some people drive for 60 yrs never die or get into an accident. Scare tactics like this just because what u have witnessed in your life is one thing. We have a 50 50 chance she could get sick, that doesn't mean we don't love them. We all have a 50 50 chance to die tonight in our sleep. Doesn't matter how well we look after our bodies or don't. I've lived on a farm for many yrs , cattle farm with lots of other animals. As I've said before we have a friend that never fixed there doe. In fact we just talked the other night he also has friends that never fixed there doe. Anyways I'm sure a few of u think I'm a cruel person , not even educated on rabbits. We believe we have made the right choice & our vet didn't disagree with us. It's all up the the family to make the final decision. There are a lot of parents out there that should of never had kids yet we all ignore what's going on in every day life. Have a great night all God Bless
 

Scarly

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We have a neutered male (came to us neutered) and an unspayed female.
Our female is the most loving and affectionate bunny I have ever had the pleasure of meeting. She's 1 1/2 years old and has excellent litter habits and zero aggression or destructive behaviors. The only time she does anything is if I have had the male on my lap and then have her on my lap she'll start sniffing me and then pee on me. But simple enough to just throw a towel over my lap or have her up on my lap first.

I previously lost a female bunny during a spay procedure so I am very hesitant to do it again as I love this girl so much. I do understand the risks of cancer in female rabbits and it's something the vet is actively monitoring with her. But our vet agrees that a spay is not needed for female rabbits and can always be done if cancer is detected early enough. Of course, monitoring this, in the long run, will cost you more than a spay and you may at some point still need to get your bunny spayed if she does develop cancer.
 

apryl

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I’ve had my rabbit for about three years now and they haven’t been fixed. Still the cutest, silliest bunny! Since you have the male neutered you don’t have to worry about babies. I say you’re fine!
 

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