Aggressive bunny..?

Discussion in 'Rabbit Knowledge Library' started by Bambithebunny, Dec 7, 2019.

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  1. Dec 7, 2019 #1

    Bambithebunny

    Bambithebunny

    Bambithebunny

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    Hello! I currently have two bunnies : Bambi who is 9 months old, spayed and I’ve had her for 8 months now and Mocha who is 06 months old. I adopted Mocha 2 weeks ago and he had just been neutered so I’m waiting for his hormones to calm down before introducing him to Bambi. They are both kept in the same room but in different play pens and I let them free roam one at a time. The problem is that since I got Mocha, Bambi became aggressive. She was so sweet before but now it looks like a totally different bunny. She clearly knows that there’s a new bunny in her “territory” because I do switch some things in their playpen so they can get used to the other’s smell and I think that maybe that’s why her personality changed but its really overwhelming. When I let her free roam I can’t even walk next to her or get down to pick up something without her luuuunging at my hand/feet while making a noise of annoyance. She also bites me hard (something she never really did before) and immediately after that she starts licking me and putting her head under my hand so I pet can pet her. Like I don’t know what to do because I know she still likes me and love it when I pet her but she became so aggressive that I’m sometimes scared to go near her because I know she gonna jump at me. Even when I stop petting her she start scratching me so much. So if you can help me figure out what’s happening or how I can change the situation it would be really appreciated! Thank you very much.
     
  2. Dec 7, 2019 #2

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

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    hmm, can you put up a cage in a neutral territory. Then that behavior won’t be that guarding. Otherwise, make sure your hand and yourself dosen’t smell like the other bunny. Wash your hands and spray perfume on yourself.

    Is she spayed? If not, spaying will help a lot of her guarding her place. Doe are prone to be more guarding of their territory than bucks are. That’s why you never put a buck in a doe cage when they are supposed to breed ^^
     
  3. Dec 7, 2019 #3

    Bambithebunny

    Bambithebunny

    Bambithebunny

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    She is spayed... And I could put a cage in a neutral territory but isn’t better for them to get used to each others smell? Because I’m going to start the bonding process in 1 week.
     
  4. Dec 7, 2019 #4

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

    Hermelin

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    I meant both of them being putted in a neutral territory next to eachother. It might not make her so guarding towards the new bunny because of a new area.

    I wouldn’t try to bond until she stopped being so aggressive towards you. The other bunny will certainly get hurt and they will fight. Just judging how she reacts to you and the smell of the other bunny.

    Myself have never managed to bond my doe with any of my bucks. So some bond won’t work and going too fast might hurt your bunnies. Their fights are intense, one of my bucks got a bit of his ear bitten off by my doe. She didn’t react to me smelling like the other bunnies and she had lived next to him for 6 months. That bond was a total fail for me and I got one shoe destroyed by my doe when I stepped between their fight. Just a heads up on how bad a fight can be. If I didn’t step between them my buck would had been a lot more hurt than a small wound on the ear.

    Just a heads up not all bunny will work great togheter and some bunnies are a lot harder to find a bonding mate to.

    So to be on the safer side, wait until she won’t act aggressive towards the other bunny smell, if they can see each other and not fight. Then you can start the bonding process. It would be optimal starting a bonding process when they lay next to each other even though they have fence between and try to groom each other.
     
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  5. Dec 7, 2019 #5

    JenGibs

    JenGibs

    JenGibs

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    Pleeeeeease do not start any bonding process any time soon! There will be blood as Hermin said above!

    Some bunnies can NOT be bonded- period. It is also a long and delicate process.

    Another question I have is that you mentioned Bambi is 9 months old and you have had her for 8. Someone gave you a 4 week old bunny???? If so, they are a complete moron.

    Also remember that baby or juvenile bunnies are not grown and can change their tune quickly. I have read a lot about bunnies (even siblings) who get along perfectly and boom! they start fighting at 8 months old! That’s because they are not fully mature yet.

    I also believe Bambi is protecting her territory and her hooman. My buns have been bonded for years but if I introduce another bun, my two can turn on each other out of confusion or because the new buns smell is on the other one.

    At this point in your situation, if you keep them in the same room, keep them in separate areas and do not swap things in between them just yet. It’s too soon based on what you have stated. The new bun may have left his scent somewhere in the space you let them free roam in. Bambi smells it and she appears not to be happy about it- hence her reacting to you in a negative way in the free roam space. Yes, they will get used to each other’s smell. But don’t do any type of bonding stuff until they can calmly lay next to each other on each side of the separation area. Once they do, and have been for a little while, you need to have a neutral area- one where neither has ANY of their smell- and introduce them in that area- slowly. Bambi sounds a little more aggressive and that is okay. It just lets you know you need to take this very slow and cautiously. If you get to the point of neutral space, you need to sit with them- do not leave them alone- and do a short session. Even if it is going perfectly, don’t let it go on long enough until the perfection fades away. One good fight can ruin any chances of them bonding...ever.

    Remember these guys are still young and growing mentally. Don’t rush the process or it will be a huge fail (based on what you have said so far). Also, be mentally prepared to house both of them separate forever if need be. I have 2- sets of bonded pairs and a solo bun. The solo bun can lay next to any of them with a separation and everyone is happy. If I remove the separation- not good. And it’s been this way for a year or more. They actually seem to look forward to seeing each other on the other side of the pen too so it just blows my mind. Also, the solo bun can mingle freely with the male bun in each set but I cannot allow the female bun in each set to be freely with her. I swear they would eat her! Also the 2 sets cannot all hang together. The 2 males can. There is a lot of shuffling that goes on in my house LOL but I learned a long time ago that I will need separate living spaces permanently and that’s what I have. They all have free roam space. One set free roams downstairs and the other set free roams upstairs. No one gets the stairs themselves! The solo bun has her own space but is a 3 pound dwarf lionhead so she is frequently carried around or sitting with one of us somewhere. She gets free roam time in any part of the house and I just put a pair up for a little while. At night, they all go to their respective areas- no one free roams at night.

    I have 2 daughters, 5 bunnies, 2 cats and a fish. I swear I feel like I have 9 children! The fish is cool. LOL. All the bunnies are fine with the cats and the cats with them. I just play mediator!
    Good luck!
     
  6. Dec 8, 2019 #6

    Bambithebunny

    Bambithebunny

    Bambithebunny

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    Thank you very much for your help! Yes I had no intention to let them interact directly without them first being able to relax next to the other one while they are separated. I do not wanna rush into anything too fast! Thanks again
     

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