Advice on new bunny

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sootybunny

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Hi, do you may have seen my post about our new arrival. This nethie is of course hugely different to Charlie who is quite literally the most relaxed gentle giant ever. I sort of instantly bonded with him when we got him. He was never scared or flighty and he is big enough to free roam downstairs with no problem. Not this little guy is super tiny, very scared and of courSe can’t go near Charles. So he is set up in my bedroom in a crate with all his food and water and hay etc. He came home yesterday. I want him to have free roam of my room. Should I still leave him alone in the crate for first two days so he can settle or should I scrap the crate and make him a corner in the room with his stuff and start as I mean to go on? The crate actually opens at the top so I can’t leave it open for access if that makes sense. I have another crate in the shed with forward opening doors so maybe i should get that sorted. Or maybe he should just have a little pen to begin with. I would welcome your thoughts.
 

chlocbfkgj

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We’ve always transitioned our rabbits from what they’re used to, to what we do. It seems to help them settle in at our farm easier. So my opinion would be to reference back to what he was being kept in then go from there and slowly transition him to what you want him to be in
 

Blue eyes

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I suggest you start with the crate that has forward opening doors. And, yes, keep him in it for 48 hours minimum. This is the easiest and best way to get him used to a space he can call his own. This is important even for a bunny that will be free range. He needs his own space in which he knows he won't be bothered. This also allows him time to establish the litter box as his box.

Once he's been confined for a couple days, he should only get limited space in your room initially. Use an x-pen or similar to limit his ranging area. This makes sure he knows just where his litter box is and how to return to it as needed.

A common mistake made by those wanting to free range a rabbit is offering too much freedom too soon. This often results in potty accidents and/or behavior issues. It's best to go slowly and only gradually allow him more space.
 

sootybunny

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I suggest you start with the crate that has forward opening doors. And, yes, keep him in it for 48 hours minimum. This is the easiest and best way to get him used to a space he can call his own. This is important even for a bunny that will be free range. He needs his own space in which he knows he won't be bothered. This also allows him time to establish the litter box as his box.

Once he's been confined for a couple days, he should only get limited space in your room initially. Use an x-pen or similar to limit his ranging area. This makes sure he knows just where his litter box is and how to return to it as needed.

A common mistake made by those wanting to free range a rabbit is offering too much freedom too soon. This often results in potty accidents and/or behavior issues. It's best to go slowly and only gradually allow him more space.
Thank you that’s really brilliant advice . I’ll set the other crate up today.
 

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