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I believe we only have 1 rabbit rescue in our state. There might be more. The one local is not an actual place. The rabbits are in foster homes. In my opinion they are a bit strict with rules when it comes allowing the bunnies to be adopted out. I understand rules and guidelines are in place likely for good reason and to protect the rabbits. It seems excessive though. Several of the rabbits have been there for years. One situation was publicized and there were many people interested. Did they apply to adopt? I do not know. I had tried to adopt an older bunny and wasn’t allowed to apply because I have a young rabbit who is not spayed. I looked at a rabbit rescue that has a local rabbit house society chapter 4 hours away. They seemed much more open if you wanted to adopt to let you. How common is it to have fairly strict rules for adoption? The one local likes you to apply, they like to make a match then they supervise visits and pet introductions which they decide if you are a match. If you have kids, other pets you may not be a good match to them. Not all kids are loud, many children can be taught how to handle rabbits etc. How common is it to have strict guidelines? In your area are the no kill shelter’s keeping pets for years?
 

Blue eyes

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I have found rabbit rescues to vary somewhat in their requirements. I used to be offended at some of their rules, but have come to understand why they are there. The bulk of those 'rules' are to prevent either more breeding (and therefore more rabbits needing to go to rescues) or more returns to the rescue.

For example, I can see why they wouldn't want one of their rabbits to go to a home with a young intact rabbit. Even if the rescue rabbit is fixed, there is a real chance that when the young rabbit's hormones kick in, the two will not get along. If that occurs, the adopter may decide to return the rabbit (or worse). That puts more burden on the rescue (and stresses the rabbit). Once your rabbit is fixed, they'd be happy to help find a bondmate.

In other cases, I have found that the rescue will appear far more strict on paper than in actuality. They do this so they have the option to refuse someone that doesn't seem suited. I can get that as well.

I had a couple young kids when I went to a rabbit rescue years ago. The one in charge was a retired teacher. When we met to check out the rabbits, she admitted that before she met us, she didn't think it would work because of the children. But seeing my boys interact with the rabbits there, she felt confident that they would do well.

So they like to have these meets and intros not just for the sake of the rabbits, but to minimize the burden on the rescue that is created when an adopted rabbit is returned to the rescue. Once a rabbit is adopted out, that slot is usually quickly filled with another rescue rabbit. If the first rabbit has to be returned, they may not have adequate space to accommodate it anymore.
 

Blue eyes

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Here's a rescue in Iowa (though you may already be aware of it).

They currently have 14 bonded pairs. They are running a summer special -- $50 for a pair. They also have singles for their usual $50 for fixed rabbit.
 

John Wick

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As a long-time adoption screener for two rabbit rescues (both on the higher end of adopter expectations), I understand that the number of rules, time spent screening, etc. can be a lot, but our rescues are prioritizing finding our rabbits forever homes where they can thrive. Yes, more rabbits could be adopted out if screening was less stringent, but some rescues (like the ones I volunteer at) would rather the rabbits stay with loving foster volunteers for a bit longer until we find a wonderful permanent home for them.

I will add (even more anecdotally than my previous paragraph) that rescues and their foster networks are often extremely full, so when an adopter states they are returning a rabbit, it is very difficult to secure them a stable spot back in the rescue system because they were likely replaced by a new intake from an overfilled shelter or good Samaritan stray catch. Returns are a worst case scenario, so when adopters go through the process successfully, it really maximizes the likelihood that the rabbit has found a great forever home.
 

HalaBuns

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As a rescuer and foster mumma, I do understand why there are so many rules, although appreciate that it may seem as though we are being overly picky.

More often than not, these buns come to us sick and traumatised, having endured horrendous mistreatment all their lives before eventually being discarded (of course sometimes the bunnies may have escaped, but that is rare to be honest, much more likely that they have been dumped). We then invest so much of ourselves emotionally and financially, covering all of their vet bills and food, sleepless nights when they’re initially rescued in case they don’t make it, and being completely overjoyed when they start to recover. We don’t let them go until they are completely healed and by that time we’re extremely protective of these little creatures and have a duty to them to ensure they go to the perfect home.

If we rehome them somewhere where they are unhappy or worse, returned, or even put back on the street, that is 100% on us as their carers and we will have failed them. So that’s the thought process behind it all. These little fluffies have been through so much and are totally reliant on us to make the right decision by them, so we will say no to a home if we feel it’s not the right place for them, and wait until somewhere comes up which is a better fit.

There are also some strange people out there who pretend they want to adopt, but actually want the bunny to eat. And as mentioned above, the requirement for neutering is to prevent breeding, or fighting if 2 unfixed males are placed together.
 

TreasuredFriend

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A bun couple I've known for years adopted a n/male from a local shelter after learning said bun was picked up as a stray. 2x. Originally surrendered, then adopted and abandoned 2x. Microchips helped in this matter.
 

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