15 Day Old Bunnies (Feeding and Nest Questions)

Discussion in 'Nutrition and Behavior' started by Mandii26, Mar 21, 2019.

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  1. Mar 21, 2019 #1

    Mandii26

    Mandii26

    Mandii26

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    Hi there I am a new member and new bunny mom!

    I have recently adopted two bunnies one male named Beauford (Netherland Dwarf) and one female named Beatrice (Holland Lops)!
    The owners never notified me she was pregnant and I never really realized the signs she was showing until she gave birth to her kits!
    I’m completely new on how to take care of them but I have researched like crazy and done what I could to try and keep them healthy.

    Now they are 15 days old and I’m stuck on what to do next.

    When I look at other 15 day old kits, I feel like mine are very small. And I’m assuming because they are a smaller breed of bunnies?

    They don’t want to stay in their nest anymore, and I want to make sure it’s okay to take it away? I feel like they are a bit small to even get back in, but when I try to keep them in the nest they want out.

    They like to sleep for most of the morning in a blanket and are active at night.

    Now next question.

    How do I get them to start eating pellets and hay? They don’t want to acknowledge it.

    And when I try to have them feed at the same time as mom, she tries to eat their food too.

    Are they just too young to start eating?

    Any help would be appreciated!
     
  2. Mar 21, 2019 #2

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

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    They do not need to be eating solid food just yet they are only 2 weeks old, they will start eating it around 6 weeks. They need mom's milk until 8 weeks old. Unless it is cold, which in Florida I don't think it is, they don't necessarily need the nest box anymore, unless they are sleeping in it at night still. How long have you had these rabbits? Are they living together? Also, I have a Beatrice, but I call her Tris, I named her after the girl on the Divergent Series. IMG_1769.jpg This is my Beatrice and her first litter.
     
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  3. Mar 21, 2019 #3

    Mandii26

    Mandii26

    Mandii26

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    Thank You so much for responding! That makes me feel better. I feel like I have been driving myself nuts trying to find research.

    In Florida is for sure not cold, but we have them in doors at all times, and I don’t really have our ac too cold, since I like the heat.

    That’s the thing I think maybe our nest box is a bit high? I don’t ever see them trying to get back in it, but I feel like they are a bit small.

    I’ve have Beuford and Beatrice for a little over a month now! Her nickname is Bea. I actually got her name because of an inside joke between me and my boyfriend, it’s kind of like a Bonnie and Clyde nickname ha

    Do you have any recommendation on a “cage” or “penn” set up that you have for them. I need to get something for bea to relax on, since every time her babies go near her they want to nurse, And she’s a greater jumper she hops right out of our gate.

    These are the kits about 8 days ago. The resent stuff I have are videos and they
    Won’t upload. =/

    Also I love Divergent!!
     

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  4. Mar 21, 2019 #4

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

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    All of mine are outside but I used to use a cage from Rural King for "home base" and it would be too high for the babies to jump into. They are dwarf babies so they are going to be a bit small. I would recommend getting them both spayed and neutered after she weans the babies. He can get neutered now. If they are living together you need to separate him from her as if he is not neutered I can 100% guarantee she is prego again. If you have had them for a little over a month then he is the dad and the owners did not breed them, rabbits are only pregnant for 31 days. Put a block of wood in front of it that is lower than the nestbox to give them a "step" to get in. Make sure it is untreated wood.
     
  5. Mar 21, 2019 #5

    Mandii26

    Mandii26

    Mandii26

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    The very first day we got them, we had them together for no more than a minute. So that’s what I was thinking as well, that with out me noticing, that he was able to get her pregnant! He is neutered now! He’s about day 10 of recovering, and we haven’t put them together since the first day we got them, and I was told that I should wait a month after his surgery to put them back together.

    That perfect I’ll try to make a bit of a step for them just in case they still want their nest.

    Thank you so much!
     
  6. Mar 21, 2019 #6

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

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    It can happen in mere seconds. There's a saying for a reason lol.
     
  7. Mar 21, 2019 #7

    Preitler

    Preitler

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    Actually, they start to eat solids at 2 weeks. Little nibbling here and there, on whatever the doe eats - that's what they can stomach first since they get their gut bacteria from mom. But no sweett treats for the little ones. In a pinch they could be weaned at 4 weeks (like, when the doe was with the buck when giving birth and got impregnated again), since then they can thrive on solids alone, but it's not recommended, better are 6 or 8 weeks or as long as the doe puts up with nursing.

    You can tilt the nest box on its side, so they'll still have a safe, warm corner and the placxe where the doe goes for feeding them. Or put something like a ramp in front.

    An elevated resting board or shelf for the doe would be a good idea. I would give enough food so that the doe can't eat it all - nursing does rarely get fat ;) -, or put some in a upside down cardboard box with some holes too small for the doe.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2019
  8. Mar 21, 2019 #8

    JBun

    JBun

    JBun

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    What preitler said. It's not six weeks old when they start to eat solid food, they start to nibble a little bit once they are 2 weeks and out of the nest, and gradually increase the amount as they get older. You don't usually need to worry about it, they will do it naturally on their own as they get curious about their environment, and also more hungry as they grow, as long as the food and water is there for them to be able to access it.

    Also the doe should be getting free fed grass hay(maybe also some alfalfa hay for the extra calcium and protein it contains), meaning it should always be available to her(and the kits). Like was said, the kits will eventually start nibbling on the hay and start eating more of it as they grow. The doe should also be getting free fed pellets, or close to free fed, as she is nursing and needs more than 3 times the usual amount of pellets to be able to have the nutrients she needs to nurse. She needs the extra calcium and protein the pellets provide. The babies should also be able to access the mom's water, though if she has a dish and it's large and/or deep, this could be a danger to the babies so I would change to something safer.

    I would clean the nest box out, turn it on it's side and put down a fresh layer of hay(or a fleece blanket with no loose strings or holes, as this can tangle their legs and cause severe injury) for the babies to nap in, or you can provide a step if that works. Give mom a box or shelf of some sort so the babies aren't constantly pestering her to nurse. If you want to post a picture of your current set up, it would make it easier to give some suggestions on improving the space.
    https://flashsplace.webs.com/accidentallitters.htm

    You do want to wait at least 4 weeks post neuter, before rebonding. But some males can even be fertile up to 6 weeks, so waiting 6-8 weeks is usually what's recommended unless the doe is already spayed. Plus there are the babies now, and it's not usually a good idea to do the bonding while the babies are still with mom as you don't know how the male will react or if he will be aggressive towards them. In rare instances the dad will be good with the babies, but if you aren't absolutely sure about this, remember that it's possible he could harm them, seriously injure them, or even kill them, so best not to attempt it unless you know what you are doing in this respect and understand the complexities of bonding.
    https://www.cottontails-rescue.org.uk/information/bonding-bunnies/
    http://www.saveabunny.org/rabbitcare/bonding-guide
     
  9. Mar 21, 2019 #9

    Augustus&HazelGrace

    Augustus&HazelGrace

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    I meant that they shouldn't be eating all solid foods at 2 weeks. Sorry, I should have reworded that.
     
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