11 kits advice please

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Happy.ears

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My Doe had 11 kits last night, I was wondering if there is anything that I can do to help her or just let her be. I just worry she won't be able to feed them all. Any advice would be appreciated it!
 

Dandy&Tuli4693

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I'm no bunny breeder expert so dont quote me on this 😅

Buttt, I would leave her alone or keep watching her but just not touch or bother her so you can make sure all the kits get fed, if they dont seem like they are all getting milk maybe run to the store really quick and get some KMR milk replacer or some goat milk
 

JBun

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I would check the kits twice a day after she feeds(usually early morning and late evening), to make sure they all have nice full milk bellies. If she hasn't fed them yet, she should feed them within 36 hours after they were born. If she hasn't by then, you may need to intervene by very carefully helping them suckle off her, being very careful she doesn't kick or stomp on them, and doing this on the floor so they don't fall and get injured if something happens. If she isn't producing milk, syringe feeds become necessary. Though this is a last resort as there is a high risk of aspiration occurring, which would be fatal.

And make sure she is getting plenty of food. Free fed alfalfa based good quality pellet and free fed grass hay. Alfalfa/lucerne hay can also be fed. It's important for a nursing doe to be fed enough of a high calcium food like alfalfa hay/pellets.

 

Happy Hollands

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WOW congratulations! Ideally, there would be another doe who kindled around the same time to foster some of the babies. I doubt this is the case, though.

Like JBun suggested, keep checking the newborns often to see if everyone is getting fed the same amount. She most likely has 6 teats (depending on the breed), so not every baby will get fed during every feeding.
I recommend letting nature take its course, with assistance, as the rabbit body is amazing and she may be able to feed them all. Try to avoid KMR / whipping cream if possible, it doesn't have the same nutrients as rabbit milk does.

Feed her unlimited alfalfa hay / pellets, along with (1-2 tablespoons each of) calf manna and oats daily - these will help with milk production. Best of luck!
 

Happy.ears

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I would check the kits twice a day after she feeds(usually early morning and late evening), to make sure they all have nice full milk bellies. If she hasn't fed them yet, she should feed them within 36 hours after they were born. If she hasn't by then, you may need to intervene by very carefully helping them suckle off her, being very careful she doesn't kick or stomp on them, and doing this on the floor so they don't fall and get injured if something happens. If she isn't producing milk, syringe feeds become necessary. Though this is a last resort as there is a high risk of aspiration occurring, which would be fatal.

And make sure she is getting plenty of food. Free fed alfalfa based good quality pellet and free fed grass hay. Alfalfa/lucerne hay can also be fed. It's important for a nursing doe to be fed enough of a high calcium food like alfalfa hay/pellets.

Thanks a lot, that is what I did after I noticed the 3 smallest haven't eaten. I took them apart and going to be doing 2 feedings for them every day on my lap. So she is left with 8 Bunnies on the nesting box.
 

Happy.ears

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WOW congratulations! Ideally, there would be another doe who kindled around the same time to foster some of the babies. I doubt this is the case, though.

Like JBun suggested, keep checking the newborns often to see if everyone is getting fed the same amount. She most likely has 6 teats (depending on the breed), so not every baby will get fed during every feeding.
I recommend letting nature take its course, with assistance, as the rabbit body is amazing and she may be able to feed them all. Try to avoid KMR / whipping cream if possible, it doesn't have the same nutrients as rabbit milk does.

Feed her unlimited alfalfa hay / pellets, along with (1-2 tablespoons each of) calf manna and oats daily - these will help with milk production. Best of luck!
Thank you! No, this time I don't have another doe that kindled at same time as the pregnancy was result of a free roam rabbit jumping really high to the cage on a moment that we were cleaning and left door open, we were unsure that he got her but sure he did really well. I have a doe that had a Singleton 11 days ago but figured the first milk of mom may have colostrum as in humans? So will do the first days with moma and then change to the other doe. I took the 3 smallest babies and going to be feeding them with the doe on my lap since I noticed the are not eating and were very skinny.
 

Happy Hollands

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Thank you! No, this time I don't have another doe that kindled at same time as the pregnancy was result of a free roam rabbit jumping really high to the cage on a moment that we were cleaning and left door open, we were unsure that he got her but sure he did really well. I have a doe that had a Singleton 11 days ago but figured the first milk of mom may have colostrum as in humans? So will do the first days with moma and then change to the other doe. I took the 3 smallest babies and going to be feeding them with the doe on my lap since I noticed the are not eating and were very skinny.
It sounds like you're doing everything right... assisted feedings, monitoring, and a fostering plan.

Look how small they are (I am 5'2", so my hands are small)
The babies are smaller than usual, but that's expected with a large litter.
 
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