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Old 09-24-2006, 01:51 AM   #1
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Excerpt: First post, courtesy of Carolyn:

Just some tips that might be helpful before the chill comes.

- Rabbits generally are most comfortable between the temperatures of 50 degrees Fahrenheit and 80 degrees Fahrenheit. In the winter, rabbits need some help in keeping warm because when temperatures drop below 50 degrees Fahrenheit, they are more prone to illness. That said, as long as it is well protected from drafts and has a constant supply of liquid water a rabbit (and even newborn kits in a well-made nest) it is said that they can withstand temperatures to -20F without additional heat, but they should be provided with more hay and food.


- Black Oil Sunflower Seeds act as a hot food for rabbits and generate more body heat. Hay can do this too. Not a bad idea to have some handy for those bitterly cold nights.

- A wet rabbit is prone to getting illnesses especially if there are drafts. Keep your rabbit protected from the moisture in the air. A little wetness on the outside of the coat isn't going to harm your rabbit, but if it gets to the underlayer of the coat, it could make the rabbit very sick. Some folks keep blankets handy to wipe off wet fur when they check on their bunnies throughout the day.

- Make sure the cage is free of leaks, has a sturdy roof and sides, small mesh wire without any sharp areas, wood without splinters, and a sturdy lock.

- It's very important to protect your rabbit from the wind and drafty areas. If you have outside hutches, plastic tarps can go a long way in helping protect your rabbits. Be sure that the wind isn't able to blow through the underneath the cage, but do keep a space for the rabbit to get fresh air. Don't close the rabbit off too tight. That could cause respiratory problems and/or colds. They do need some air ventilation. Fresh air is extremely important, just not drafts as that creates stress and illness.

- If you can, provide him a box inside his cage stuffed with lots of straw or hay in which to burrow and keep warm. Blankets aren't advised as they can hold bacteria if soiled and some rabbits will chew on them and ingest them causing intestinal blockage.

- The amount of feed should be slightly increased during colder temperatures. Don't overfeed your rabbit, but know that it takes calories for rabbits to maintain its body heat.

- Provide your rabbit with hay for them to eat as well as dig into as it will help them keep warm.

- Rabbit bedding must remain clean and dry as it could freeze.

- Be sure to keep your hay and other greenery you give to your rabbits at room temperature and don't feed or allow them to eat it if it is frozen. It could be a fatal error.

- Predators can get pretty hungry when the food supply is low in the winter. Be sure your rabbits are protected.

- Rabbits will starve to death without water. Be sure they have fresh water at all times. Many people with outside rabbits use crocks instead of water bottles as the bottles can freeze up. You also want to make sure the crocks don't ice over as that is not enough of water for the rabbit to take in. If you are using crocks, be sure to change them at least twice a day as they could freeze over. You also have the option of using a heated bowl if you wish to go that route. If you wish to see what one looks like, check out:http://www.countrysidepet.com/level.itml/icOid/317

- Some folks leave a light on inside the rabbit's cage for some extra heat on very chilly nights. Others provide a space heater for their rabbits if a light won't work. Don't put it too close to your rabbit as you don't want them to overheat either. Because heat and hay are such a safety issue, some breeders use box heaters that are made for reptiles.

- If you must bring your rabbit inside, put him in the coolest room so that when you take him back outside, the drastic change in temperature won't shock his system.



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Old 02-18-2007, 07:37 PM   #2
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I have two bunnies living outside in an old insulated dog house that me and my dad fixed up this summer. It has a light that is always on in the winter for that extra heat. they have a big water tank that i change daily. the dog house is meant for a huge breed of dog so they have lots of space. how cold should it be for me to have to take them in at night? (in celcius)




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Old 03-15-2007, 05:00 PM   #3
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I have a bunny , Her name is babii and i keep her inside at all timesexcept during summer when i take her for walks but even in the room she is in, the heat is always on.

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Old 03-20-2007, 01:01 AM   #4
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Tabitha and Buddy were both outside bunnies when i got them and i keep them outside year round too. I also use insulated dog houses for them and they love them. I pack them full of straw in the winter time and the rabbits go in and make a bed out of it. We got down to freezing this winter for about a week and Tabitha did great in her dog house. I made sure that i fed her three times a day with some high fat foods so that she kept her body heat up and some fat on her body. She is very happy outside.

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Old 03-21-2007, 03:29 AM   #5
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Pipp wrote:
Quote:
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Excerpt: First post, courtesy of Carolyn:



Some folks leave a light on inside the rabbit's cage for some extra heat on very chilly nights. Others provide a space heater for their rabbits if a light won't work. Don't put it too close to your rabbit as you don't want them to overheat either. Because heat and hay are such a safety issue, some breeders use box heaters that are made for reptiles.
Quote:
What type of light is good to use?

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Old 04-07-2007, 03:04 PM   #6
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yeah i put straw w\ my bunny...thnx for the tips

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Old 01-04-2008, 01:32 PM   #7
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Using a Snugglesafe Heat Pad is a great, safe way of ensuring your rabbit is warm enough outside at night.

Pop them in the microwave in the evening for approx. 5 minutes (depending on the power of your microwave) and place in bunny's sleeping compartment, under the hay, or other bedding. The heat will last for around 10 hours.

More information here.

They are quite readily available in the UK, from Pets at Home, where they are sold for around £19. They can also be found cheaper online, some suppliers are;

Vet UK

SPH Pet Supplies (can get a bulk order of 6 here, they work out cheaper which is great for rescues.)

Although they are not 100% essential, they are very useful, particularly for solitary rabbits. They are completely chew proof (except the covers ), and require no flame or electricity to provide heat. Definitely worth the money, they will last a long time.







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