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Old 08-19-2016, 11:33 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Whiterabbitrage View Post
We wanted a big bun for our house pet too. We went to a breeder who handles the babies and breeds for temperament. He brought her home as soon as she was old enough. She has a crate but we also fixed an unused room into a room for her. We decided not to take her outside ever because of the risk of disease. We let her into the hallway when we wake up in the morning. The hallway is closed off by pet gates. Every evening we let her into the living room for a romp. She loves to play tag. That hour of excersize does the trick because she is nearly underweight at 16 pounds. She is solid muscle, unlike the fat blobs you see in photos of Flemish Giants. She is a super pet!
That's what I'm planning, to use my hallway as her enclosure with a steel baby gate at each end. I was looking at heavy duty plastic tarps today, to protect the hardwood floor. I also found some canvas tarps that have little rubber beads on them for traction, one of those could go on top of the plastic, or I have a big old entryway rug. Then when I can supervise (most of the time anyway) he/she would have the run of the rest of the apartment. I wasn't planning on taking mine outdoors either. I thought about it (thought it would be cool to walk a huge rabbit outside) but realized that even the biggest rabbits are still prey animals and can be spooked. I live in the city and there are lots of dogs around here. Many dogs, even small ones, have the instinct to go after a rabbit. And yes there's disease and also flystrike.

I'm curious about getting a large rabbit altered. I do plan to ask my rabbit vet about it, but I'm guessing the bigger the rabbit the bigger the spay/neuter cost. My other buns came pre-neutered from shelters, so I have no idea what the cost would be. I'm sure a spay is more costly than a neuter. At what age should they be done?


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Old 08-20-2016, 02:03 AM   #12
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I noticed some of the breeds you mentioned and new Zealand's and Flemish usually make great pets. I will say however that if you find a checkered giant (you'll probably have to find a breeder for these because they will probably never make it to a shelter) do some serious research on them. They are a running breed at shows and have a bit of attitude. Of course anything can be tamed but some may take more work than others. I know for shows they are notorious for being hard to handle and their size certainly doesn't help.

For a more docile large breed I would highly suggest a French Lop. I owned one for a short time until I rehomed him to kmaben on here and he was such a great pet! When you see large rabbits you don't think they would love to move but Franklin loved to explore! He was also pretty strong and his CC cage needed reinforcements.

As far as altering goes I had a vet that I worked with previously to neuter Franklin and it wasn't expensive although I did get a pretty good discount. All rabbits are a risk during surgery. From what I hear the larger they are the better they can handle anesthesia although that's not saying much as there is still a large amount of worry. The amount of drugs should and probably will be the only more expensive thing but it shouldnt make much of a difference because the cost will already be higher just simply because it is a rabbit. If that makes sense?

As far as choosing where to get a rabbit your best bet of course is a shelter but I wouldn't count out smaller rabbitries breeding for show. A rabbit must be handled during show and conditioning rabbits to things judges do such as flipping them on their backs is a feat in and of itself. If the rabbit already knows how to be handled from show experience then you may find a winner. I will say do not look at a breeder who is selling babies at 6-8 weeks of age. Most breeders will hold onto a junior for a little bit of time before deciding it will be a pet quality rabbit.

What I did when I picked out Franklin was ask the breeder if she had any older juniors or intermediates that she wanted to rehome (5-8 mos of age) at this stage they have already been handled a good amount and maybe have been to a show or two. I then narrowed it down to two rabbits by looks (I knew I wanted a chinchilla) and from there I judged how skittish they were and how hard to handle they were. I then chose the more docile one and was very happy with how my boy turned out. Sorry to make such a long post lol



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Old 08-20-2016, 02:55 AM   #13
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I noticed some of the breeds you mentioned and new Zealand's and Flemish usually make great pets. I will say however that if you find a checkered giant (you'll probably have to find a breeder for these because they will probably never make it to a shelter) do some serious research on them. They are a running breed at shows and have a bit of attitude. Of course anything can be tamed but some may take more work than others. I know for shows they are notorious for being hard to handle and their size certainly doesn't help.

For a more docile large breed I would highly suggest a French Lop. I owned one for a short time until I rehomed him to kmaben on here and he was such a great pet! When you see large rabbits you don't think they would love to move but Franklin loved to explore! He was also pretty strong and his CC cage needed reinforcements.

As far as altering goes I had a vet that I worked with previously to neuter Franklin and it wasn't expensive although I did get a pretty good discount. All rabbits are a risk during surgery. From what I hear the larger they are the better they can handle anesthesia although that's not saying much as there is still a large amount of worry. The amount of drugs should and probably will be the only more expensive thing but it shouldnt make much of a difference because the cost will already be higher just simply because it is a rabbit. If that makes sense?

As far as choosing where to get a rabbit your best bet of course is a shelter but I wouldn't count out smaller rabbitries breeding for show. A rabbit must be handled during show and conditioning rabbits to things judges do such as flipping them on their backs is a feat in and of itself. If the rabbit already knows how to be handled from show experience then you may find a winner. I will say do not look at a breeder who is selling babies at 6-8 weeks of age. Most breeders will hold onto a junior for a little bit of time before deciding it will be a pet quality rabbit.

What I did when I picked out Franklin was ask the breeder if she had any older juniors or intermediates that she wanted to rehome (5-8 mos of age) at this stage they have already been handled a good amount and maybe have been to a show or two. I then narrowed it down to two rabbits by looks (I knew I wanted a chinchilla) and from there I judged how skittish they were and how hard to handle they were. I then chose the more docile one and was very happy with how my boy turned out. Sorry to make such a long post lol
LOL I'm the queen of long posts, so I'm not bothered if others write at length.

Re the Checkereds, I was taken with their posture and markings but I realize they're not common and wasn't really expecting to find one. Thanks for giving me the heads up about their temperament. I have seen one or two farmers selling mixed breed meat rabbits that have Checkered in them.

Most of the farm rabbits are either NZ crosses or Flemish crosses. I have seen Palominos and a few other large breeds. Unfortunately I live in the city and don't drive. The local shelter has a Flemish as a "found" rabbit, nowhere near ready to adopt assuming the owner doesn't claim it. I'm keeping an eye on the shelters now anyway. I'm also looking at local ads for breeders, but they're all selling dwarfs and other popular small pet rabbit breeds. It seems everyone wants "teacup" these days. I always tell people that a teacup is something you drink from and that's it.

Re the French lop, I like lops and if I could get one I'd certainly think hard about it. I didn't think lops came in giant size, though I think there's a British lop breed that has very long ears that trail on the ground. Anyway, I'd be happy if I could find a French Lop. There's a local breeder advertising pedigreed Champagnes d'Argent as well.
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Old 08-20-2016, 04:40 AM   #14
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I don't think a big rabbit dies any more damage than a regular size rabbit. I don't think they cost much more to feed either if you get the hay by the bail. Harvey goes through a bale about every 7- 8 months. The best part about keeping a big breed is the snuggling. I can wrap both my arms around Harvey like she's a teddy bear and we nap together. She also loves to play tag and it's pretty cool when she chased me. The only down side is that big breeds have shorter life spans.
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Old 08-21-2016, 01:16 PM   #15
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Default "Giant Rabbit: The Quest Continues"

The day before yesterday I posted an ad on the local version of Craigslist, asking for a Flemish or other giant breed for sale. I had found ads but most were farms located far from where I live and I don't drive a car. So to weed out the "sorry I don't deliver" replies I mentioned I'd need delivery from outside Toronto.

I got some interesting replies. One person sent me pics of their baby bunnies. They all had huge ears and feet, so it looked promising. Then I asked them how big the bunnies would grow to as adults. They replied "medium sized". I thanked them and told them that's a bit too small for me. The response was "oh, they're not that small, when grown up they're three feet wide!" and "besides, if they're not big enough just feed them a lot of food and they'll grow bigger". NEXT!!!

Another guy had beautiful blue purebred Flemish. Sadly, he had three adults and was only willing to sell them as a group. I think three of them would have needed more indoor space than I could provide. Too bad.

I was also contacted by a show breeder of Flemish and English Lop. I saw their Facebook page where they're advertising some Flemish does for sale (I think adults) but they're $100 which strikes me as a bit pricey, especially since I plan to neuter. The lops look really interesting and I read that this breed has a great personality. I asked if they have any lops for sale and (cringe) the price.

I'm guessing that show rabbits might be more used to handling than one that's raised in a barn? Are there advantages to buying a pet rabbit from a show breeder as opposed to a meat rabbit farm? (Advantages that would justify the higher price).
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Old 01-08-2017, 02:15 AM   #16
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Sorry for answering so late. I'm hoping you found a nice big bunny by now!

For the price on a Flemish that is actually pretty standard. At least that's is how much a lady I know sells hers for (pet or show). The English lips I can imagine are more expensive and they are wonderful rabbits!

As far as meat vs show breeders honestly it really depends on the person. You seem to have got of instincts and I would say a person that you feel actually cares for their rabbits and handles them more is someone I would choose over other deciders like pricing. Ask questions about the mother and father or just the breed in general, like is there anything that's different with this breed compared to others. Also if your breeder isn't too far ask to come out and see the barn and ask if they would be okay with you meeting some of their rabbits. I would say a lot of breeders may not want to do this unless you put a deposit on a rabbit but it's worth asking. Another great way to meet a breeder is at a local show. Going to a show you'd be surprised how many people actually raise rabbits in your area. ARBA has a list of the main shows but also going to your local rabbit breeders association website might be a good place to check as well


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