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Old 07-19-2011, 02:32 AM   #1
MikeScone
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One of my favorite photographic subjects is nature, and birds in particular. Birds can be particularly challenging as subjects, since they are very wary and move very fast. All but two of these pictures were taken in Ireland - locations indicated [in square brackets].

It helps to start with a long lens - you'll probably want 200mm at least. This picture of a Skylark was taken at 200mm (f/5.6 @ 1/750sec).[Inishbofin, County Galway]



Longer is better - this Ringed Plover was taken at 300mm (f/5.6 @[sup]1[/sup]/2,000sec, ISO500). The wide f/5.6 aperture, as wide as the lens will do at that focal length, throws the background out of focus and lets the bird "pop". With limited depth of field, always make sure to focus on the eyes. [Inishmaan, Aran Islands]



This Pied Wagtail was also taken at 300mm (f/5.6 @ [sup]1[/sup]/500sec, ISO200). Notice the placement of the bird, according to the Rule of Thirds, which says to put the subject on a one-third line rather than precisely centered. If you're going to do that, though, make sure that the bird is looking into the frame and not out of it - in this image, if the Wagtail were looking left instead of right it would throw the picture out of balance.

Pied Wagtail at Slieve League, County Donegal:



If you can get the bird to look right at you, that's a plus, especially if it looks interested. The "tongue click" technique sometimes works, or a low whistle, which is what I did to attract the attention of this Wheatear (once again, 300mm, at an exposure of f5.6 @ 1/350)[Achill Island, County Mayo]:



In-flight pictures can be especially tricky. You'll want the highest shutter speed you can get to freeze the motion, but that will require a wide aperture. With the limited depth of field of long lenses at wide apertures, this is where a really good autofocus system can prove its worth. If your camera has a "continuous autofocus" mode, use it. With my Nikon in "Auto-C", I center the bird in the frame and push the shutter button halfway to activate the autofocus. The camera focuses on the bird, and as long as I hold the shutter halfway down and track the bird, the camera changes focus sensors to keep the bird in focus as it moves around the frame. When the picture is what I want, I push the shutter all the way and take the shot.

Fulmar, taken at 280mm (f/5.6@1/2000sec) [Carrick-a-Rede, County Antrim]:



Another Fulmar, 200mm (f/5.6 @ 1/1500)[Ft. Dunree, Inishowen, Co. Donegal]:



It sometimes helps to bump up the ISO a bit to allow higher shutter speeds - this picture of an Arctic Tern was taken at ISO 500 instead of the normal ISO 200 (300mm focal length, f/5.6@1/2000). Be careful not to increase the ISO to the point where your camera introduces noise into the image - experiment a bit and see how high you can go without losing image quality. With the D7000 you can go to ISO 1600 at least, but on my old Fuji S2 I couldn't go even as high as 800.

Arctic Tern on Inishmaan, Aran Islands:



Note that with all of the in-flight pictures I have the bird either centered, or on a one-third point flying into the frame. You never want the bird to be on one side, flying out of the frame.

It's a plus if you can include something in the frame to indicate the bird's environment. Here, these Razorbills are nesting on a cliff face. Because they were stationary, I could afford to stop down the lens to get some more depth of field to show both the birds and the rocks in focus (300mm, f/11 @ 1/60). Normally, you shouldn't try to hand-hold a lens when the shutter speed is less than the focal length - in other words, at 300mm you should try for a shutter speed over 1/300th. This is where image stabilization (Canon's IS) or vibration reduction (Nikon's VR) really comes into its own - because the lens was compensating for any vibration in my holding the camera, I could use a shutter speed as slow as 1/60 and still get a sharp picture (40+ years of practice doesn't hurt, either).

Razorbills [Carrick-a-Rede, County Antrim]



Sanderlings in the surf [Inishmaan, Aran Islands]:



A Jackdaw in the ruins of the Rock of Cashel, County Tipperary:



The photographs I like the best show the bird actually doing something. It can take a few tries, or a lot of patience, but if the bird is calling or singing it's worthwhile waiting for the perfect shot.

A Rook in full cry (250mm, f/5@1/500)[Fota, County Cork]:



A Song Thrush singing on a rock wall (300mm, f/5.6@1/500)[Inisheer, Aran Islands]:



Catching a landing water bird can combine the challenges of flying shots and action pictures - continuous autofocus helps, if you can track the bird as it approaches to land, then shoot just as it touches down. Here, a Canada Goose lands in the pond at Cornell's Lab of Ornithology at Sapsucker Woods in Ithaca, NY:


Finally, if you can get in really close, do it! This is seldom an option for wild birds, but you can get pictures under controlled circumstances which don't look like they were staged. Look for raptor demonstrations or falconry, or even birds at zoos or wildlife parks, where the bird is used to having people get close. This Kestrel was part of a falconry demo at Stirling Castle in Scotland (200mm, f/5.6@1/125):


And as one bonus, a famous press photographer was once asked his rule for getting great photographs. He said, "f/8 and be there". In other words, you can't get the shot if you're not there - so get out and take pictures!




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Old 07-27-2011, 05:16 PM   #2
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Firstly, I want to say absolutely stunning!! and it has taken me forever to come back to this site lol. I've worked all over the country with birds, and have missed out on sooo many things because of lack of a good camera.

I can only lay in the yard and get baby bird pics lol



Thanks for all your help again on the other thread. I may search you out for other questions in the futuer if you don't mind. =)


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Old 07-27-2011, 09:49 PM   #3
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Very good catch Mike. Loved the pics. When we hit northern Europe five years ago we bought a professional Sony with a monster Leica lens. Took some really fantastic shots from a long ways off--but, needed a heavy duty tripod.
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Old 07-28-2011, 12:54 AM   #4
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Here's my picture of a baby robin - a Scottish robin, that is, taken on the Isle of Mull:

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Old 07-28-2011, 01:58 AM   #5
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These are incredible!!!!!
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Old 08-02-2011, 02:59 PM   #6
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still has the chubby thrasher shape like the american robins.

I just got another birding job up in N.E. Ohio, not too far from home, and before I leave I'm going to see if I can get the new lens. Would just like to have some nice stuff to share.
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Old 08-04-2011, 04:56 PM   #7
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GorbyJobRabbits wrote:
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still has the chubby thrasher shape like the american robins.
As babies, yes. The adults really look very little like our robins.




The same is true of Irish "goldfinches" - a very colorful bird, indeed, but not the same as our American birds of the same name.

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Old 08-04-2011, 05:18 PM   #8
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the adults do remind me more of a warbler in a way.

and that is a stunning finch. I would think it would have a different name because of the coloring. lol
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Old 04-29-2012, 07:11 PM   #9
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There were lots of birds on my feeder this Spring morning. Here are a few of the shots I took:

Blue Jay:


Brown-headed Cowbird:



Redwing Blackbird:



Chipping Sparrow and a pair of House Finches - the female on the left, male on right:



Here are the House Finches alone, male first...



... and the female.


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Old 05-27-2012, 04:58 PM   #10
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Another colorful bird - black and white and red all over, as the old riddle says


Rose-Breasted Grosbeak


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