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Old 01-15-2017, 01:54 AM   #11
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When I look over the local rabbit for sale ads, I see a lot of misidentified breeds and crosses advertised as purebreds. Shelters are the worst offenders. The biggest shelter for rabbits in my area advertises ALL shorthaired, medium sized, erect eared rabbits as "Americans". Americans are a rare breed and it's highly unlikely that any shelter's rabbits would all be of that breed. I also see broken coloured rabbits advertised as "rare English Spot" by both private sellers and shelters. Any rabbit with agouti colouring and weighing 5 lb or more is advertised as "Flemish Giant". And of course, ads selling "Netherland Dwarfs" that don't even resemble Netherlands are extremely common.

I even see plain dwarf-medium sized lops (probably Holland crosses) advertised as English Lops (large breed, very short hair, very long ears) and French lops (basically a giant breed, largest lop breed).

I see a lot of ads for lionheads, they're popular because they're cute and fuzzy as babies. Sadly, many end up in shelters because of their grooming requirements, or because fuzzball babies grow up to be "not quite so fuzzy" and of course they shed all over the place. My Zelda is a lionhead cross, so even though her hair is a lot shorter than a standard lionhead coat, it's a constant battle to keep ahead of her shedding, both by grooming and cleaning up the balls of shed fur.

One trend that makes me uncomfortable is the extreme miniaturization of certain breeds. In my area there are a couple of breeders who brag about their (grossly overpriced) "fancy" "teacup" Netherlands and lionheads. This can't be good for either breed. I've always been opposed to the whole "teacup" nonsense, it causes horrific birth defects and suffering for the poor animals created by greedy people who think of living things as wind-up toys.


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Old 01-15-2017, 03:58 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by BlackRabbits View Post
When I look over the local rabbit for sale ads, I see a lot of misidentified breeds and crosses advertised as purebreds. Shelters are the worst offenders.
To be fair, people are WAY more likely to adopt a 'rare purebred superspecial rabbit x' than a mixed breed rabbit. This is true of any animal (with the exception of a dog being labeled anything pit bull mix)- if the tag says something fancy, people are more likely to give the animal a chance. It's a 'marketing' strategy for the "harder to adopts" so to speak.


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Old 01-15-2017, 02:47 PM   #13
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To be fair, people are WAY more likely to adopt a 'rare purebred superspecial rabbit x' than a mixed breed rabbit. This is true of any animal (with the exception of a dog being labeled anything pit bull mix)- if the tag says something fancy, people are more likely to give the animal a chance. It's a 'marketing' strategy for the "harder to adopts" so to speak.
I understand what you're saying. I know that shelters have to find homes for these rabbits, and that often the breed is misidentified, but not deliberately.

But deliberately misrepresenting the breed or characteristics of a pet up for adoption is just plain wrong. It's a recipe for a bounce back to the shelter when the new owner realizes they've been had. Especially if, for example, the adopter wanted a giant breed rabbit and the rabbit they adopt stops growing at 5 lb. Or they find out that the "rare English Spot" they adopted is actually a plain ordinary mixed breed rabbit, not "rare" at all. Or, the adopter wanted a shorthaired rabbit and ended up with a Lionhead or Angora who sheds all over the place and requires constant grooming.

People have a right to know (within reason) what to expect when they adopt. And the public often views rabbits and other smaller pets as disposable. So there's a very real risk that a rabbit who was "marketed" with false advertising could be dumped outdoors because the owner can't find a home for it and can't keep it. Not all shelters and rescues are willing to take animals back, or they charge a high fee to do so.
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Old 01-15-2017, 06:16 PM   #14
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It doesnt matter to pure bred or a cross breed as long as i can give a loving secure home. I recently adopted a bunny and the breed the adoption centre said she was was no way in hell is that her breed. Rwaf and bunnyhugga helped me identify her


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